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Vijay Wilfred posted: Different folks give different definitions for green buildings. What is the best definition? 1 year ago

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Vijay Wilfred posted: Do all bioplastics degrade in the environment? 1 year ago

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Narasimhan Santhanam . No. Some bioplastics (usually those made from starch) degrade quickly in many environments; some (such as those from cellulose) degrade quickly in select environments, and some (those made from vegetable oil etc for instance), are actually drop-in replacements and do not degrade at all. So, well, many bioplastics are not biodegradable. Finally, a few conventional plastics actually biodegrade fast! Like

Narasimhan Santhanam . And here are some links for you on both biodegradable bioplastics and bioplastics that are NOT biodegradable

1. Biodegradable bioplastics - Link ; 2. Non Biodegradable bioplastics - Link
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Narasimhan Santhanam . And finally, here are some petro-based plastics that ARE biodegradable! - Link Like

Vijay Wilfred . Wow, petro-based plastics that can biodegrade? That sounds fascinating. But why are they not so prevalent in today's market yet? Like

Narasimhan Santhanam . Yep, there are petro plastics that can biodegrade.

Why do you think they are not used much? It is a no brainer - they cost a heck of a lot more than the PEs and PPs! While PE/PP and other conventional non-degradable petro plastics cost about $1-$1.5/Kg (depending on which country you are), biodegradable petro plastics such as PBAT can cost as high as $5/Kg. Any takers now? :-0)
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Gayathri Kumar . The feedstocks used for bioplastics manufacturing can be classified as follows:
First generation - Corn, Wheat, etc.
Second generation - wood, short-rotation crops such as Poplar, Willow or Miscanthus,
Third generation - biomass from algae (developmental stage) Link ;Here is a list of end products obtained from the above feedstocks - Biodegradable products - shopping/compost bags, foodware, medical applications (implants); non-biodegradable products - automotive interiors Link
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Gayathri Kumar posted: Can we use algae to produce oil? 1 year ago

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Narasimhan Santhanam . Hi Gayathri, the answer is Yes & No! Yes because technically you can get oil from a number of microalgae species that are rich in oil. Practically No, because oil from algae today costs almost three-five times as much as crude oil, so unlikely anyone is going to stand in a queue to buy it! Like

Gayathri Kumar . Thanks. When we can expect the costs to come down? Like

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